My wife and I strolled through the museum looking at the artifacts. We adored the old gloves, spikes, balls, bats and uniforms that were encased in their glass display bins. These items brought me back to a time and place before television, radar guns and luxury boxes.

When I lived in New York I had the great fortune of getting my hands on a set of US Open tennis tickets through a great ticket broker. Being a sports fan and a history fan, I understood the significance of the tournament and the value of US Open tennis tickets. There exists such a rich history to these Grand Slam events, a history one can literally feel when you actually see it in person..

HIPAA seeks to increase patient privacy by requiring that verbal communication between health care provider and patient be held to the same privacy standard as written communication. Oral privacy must be safeguarded and is regulated by HIPAA advisory groups like ISO and ANSI. Health care providers are required to take reasonable steps to protect the privacy of patient information.

Working with Andre Chiang was very inspiring also. I met him two years ago at the Sydney International Food Festival and he told me to visit if I was ever in Singapore, so I did! When you approach his restaurant, there is a very iconic looking olive tree, quite deliberately planted in the middle of a deck. This is to represent the roots of his culinary training, in the south of France.

The key to a successful transition can be creating a sense of continuity, despite a change in identity. C. Richard Reese, executive chairman of Iron Mountain, says it was a “vital records storage company” when he took the helm in 1981. With global air passenger traffic set to double in the next 20 years, airlines and airports are growing increasingly anxious about the deluge of travellers that is already jamming up overcrowded security checkpoints.But advocates of a new approach to airport screening say better security doesn have to come at the expense of travellers time, and imagine a not too distant future where passengers can sail through security with their shoes on and their shampoo stashed in their carry on.The International Air Transport Association (IATA) and the Airports Council International (ACI) are working with various governments to develop a program they call Smart Security essentially, a more efficient approach to passenger screening that makes use of new technology to hustle people through security without compromising safety.What we’re doing now is not sustainable we doing now is not sustainable, said Angela Gittens, director general of ACI, which represents the world airports.airports don have the space, the cost is escalating mightily and it won necessarily keep you safe in the future. The terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, airlines, passengers and governments have collectively spent over US$100 billion on security; airlines alone are currently spending US$8 billion a year.